Invasive Weed Prevention Strategies

 Preventing the spread of invasive weeds is necessary if we wish to preserve our native grasslands, riparian ecosystems, forests, and the abundance of animals which rely on these areas for their survival. Invasive weeds are spread by seed (wind, manure, self-disperse, and hitchhiking) and or underground rhizomes.  You can do your part by practicing the following recommendations.

The following practices are always applicable for all user groups, regardless of the operation, and are not limited to specific operations listed here.

TARGETED INVASIVE PLANT SOLUTIONS (T.I.P.S.) 

  1. Determine priority invasive plant species within your operating area.
  2. Stay informed through collaborations with regional experts, and assist staff and contractors to identify and minimize spread of invasive plant species within your operating area.
  3. Carry out regular detection surveys and record the locations of invasive plants in your operating area.
  4. Keep equipment out of areas infested by invasive plants and keep equipment yards and storage areas free of invasive plants.
  5. Regularly inspect the undercarriages of vehicles and remove any plant material found.
  6. Dispose of plant material at the site of the infestation (if no flowers are present), or bag the plant material and dispose of it (locally) in the garbage (if flowers are present).
  7. Wash plant seeds and propagules from personal gear, equipment, vehicles and machinery at designated cleaning stations before leaving infested sites. Ensure soil that is being moved does not contain invasive plant seeds or propagules.
  8. Minimize unnecessary soil disturbance during road, landing, skid trail and site preparation.
  9. Ensure soil that is being moved does not contain invasive plant seeds or propagules.
  10. Re-vegetate disturbed areas as soon after disturbance as possible using an appropriate combination of scarification, seeding, fertilizing and/or mulching. Ensure that seed used to re-vegetate will meet site objectives. Use Canada Common #1 Forage Mixture or better.
  11. Treat infestations of invasive plants prior to disturbance (pre-treatment).
  12. Monitor treatment sites for several years to ensure efficacy. Re-treat as necessary to ensure spread does not continue.

Forestry

Invasive plant management on Crown land is regulated by the BC Forest and Range Practices Act (FRPA), the BC Weed Control Act (WCA), and the Integrated Pest Management Act (IPMA).

The FRPA requires forest managers to specify and implement measures that prevent the introduction or spread of the 42 invasive plants listed under the Invasive Plants Regulation within their Forest Stewardship Plans. July 2007 Legal Status www.for.gov.bc.ca/tasb/legsregs/frpa/frparegs/invplants/ipr.htm

Silviculture & Reconnaissance Survey

  1. Consult the Invasive Alien Plant Program (IAPP) Application database to determine locations of high-risk infestations.
  2. Incorporate IAPP spatial data into planning maps (www.nric.ca/).
  3. Incorporate detection surveys into existing survey procedures.
  4. When an invasive plant is encountered: record the species, date of observation, location (UTM coordinates), and estimated area of infestation (ha or m2). IAPP field cards are available for use. Provide this information to the regional invasive plant committee coordinator or MFR invasive plant specialist, or enter the data independently.

Road Building & Maintenance

  1. Inspect gravel pits and material sources for invasive plants, and remove invasive plant seeds and materials prior to use.
  2. Where possible, begin work in un-infested areas and move toward infested areas.
  3. Promptly re-vegetate disturbed areas along roadsides, landings, and cleaned culverts.
  4. All machinery and equipment capable of carrying invasive plant propagules should be cleaned prior to moving on and off site.
  5. Grade roads in directions that do not encourage spread of seeds away from known, priority invasive plant sites. 

Harvesting and Site Preparation 

  1. Re-vegetate all harvested openings by re-establishing an appropriate stand of trees following the stocking standards prescribed in the Forest Stewardship Plan.
  2. Minimize disturbance and the duration of time the site is left un-vegetated. Consider seeding if there is a delay in re-vegetation.
  3. All machinery and equipment capable of carrying invasive plant propagules should be cleaned prior to moving on and off site.

Crown Land Leasers 

  1. Vigilantly monitor and report invasive weed infestations.
  2. Do not allow grazing animals to enter areas of high invasive weed infestation during seed dispersment time. 

Private Land Owners 

The WCA requires all land occupiers to control the spread of 48 provincial and/or regional noxious weeds on their land and premises, and specifies provisions for transportation, movement and cleaning of machinery.

www.qp.gov.bc.ca/statreg/reg/W/66_85.htm

The IPMA regulates herbicide applications that may be used to control invasive plant infestations.

www.qp.gov.bc.ca/statreg/stat/I/03058_01.htm

References and Links to Further Information Provincial and Regional Coordination

Invasive Plant Strategy for British Columbia:

www.invasiveplantcouncilbc.ca/publications/invasive-plant-strategy.pdf

 

**It is important that all private landowners, regardless of land size, recognize the importance of their contribution by putting into effect the invasive weed prevention and management strategies.

  1. Educate yourself and utilize programs provided by local regional district and or Environmental Farm Plan.
  2. Identify your management area and identify your invasive weeds…
  3. Inventory and map the invasive weeds found in your management area.
  4. Prioritize and set management goals and weed management objectives.
  5. Choose your management strategies. (Mechanical, chemical etc.)
  6. Develop your timeline for your treatment and management plan.
  7. Implement your plan and record the results. Follow up until invasive species are completely eradicated. Continue monitoring for future outbreaks.
  8. Utilize Provincial Inventory and Mapping Database, Invasive Alien Plant Program (IAPP) Application, Reference Guide and Field Forms: www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfp/invasive/IAP_01.htm 
  9. Work cooperatively with your neighbours.
  10. Keep Ministry of Transport informed of invasive weed infestations on road right of ways adjacent to your property. Mechanically remove invasive weed infestations between the road and your property, if necessary.
  11. Keep Ministry of Forests informed of invasive weed infestations on crown land adjacent to your property. Form a treatment plan, if at all possible.
  12. Familiarize yourself with the biological agents available.
  13. Utilize the MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets) to educate yourself about the products available for chemical control and the environmental impacts, if any.
  14. Get your Pesticide Applicators License if your choice is chemical control.

Recreational Users

Recreation users are able to travel large distances from area to area via the vast network of roads, trails, lakes and rivers, hence their impact in preventing the spread of invasive weeds can be monumental. Recreational users refer to anyone who ventures onto crown land for recreation purposes. (Hunters, hikers, all terrain vehicle users, horseback riders, guide outfitters, campers)

  1. Familiarize yourself with the invasive weeds of your area and that of the area you will be traveling to.
  2. When an invasive plant is encountered: record the species, date of observation, location (UTM coordinates), and estimated area of infestation (ha or m2). IAPP field cards are available for use. Provide this information to the regional invasive plant committee coordinator or MFR invasive plant specialist, or enter the data independently. (Percy Folkard)
  3. Travel on well used corridors whenever possible.
  4. Avoid traveling through areas infested by invasive weeds.
  5. Remove seed heads or flowers and place in a secure container and dispose of once you return home. (Incinerated, designated areas of refuse sites, cooked in vegetable oil, etc.)
  6. Learn to identify invasive species under attack by released biological control. Record and submit this information using the IAPP field cards.
  7. When the construction of a cat pit is necessary, please remove the sod carefully and set aside. Keep the sod moist and cool and the vegetation alive. Place the sod back over the cat pit prior to leaving.
  8. Whenever possible choose clothing that does not allow seeds to attach and drop in other areas. Carefully examine clothing when moving from one area to another for invasive weed seeds. Remove and place in secure container. Dispose as in #5.
  9. Check dogs and horses for invasive weed seeds prior to moving to a new area. Remove and dispose of as above.
  10. Examine all equipment (tents, waders, float tubes, tarps, saddles, saddle pads etc) and remove all invasive seed material prior to packing up.
  11. When packing in forage, ensure it is invasive weed free. If unsure, pack out all droppings.
  12. When moving animals from one location to another have a designated holding pen to allow for digestive cleanout prior to the move.
  13. When using ATV/Dirt or Mountain bikes avoid disturbing the soil. Never enter an invasive weed infested area. MOE regulations are applicable.

Resources

Species Identification and Management

 BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands. 2002. Field Guide to Noxious and Other Selected Weeds of British Columbia, 4th ed. www.agf.gov.bc.ca/cropprot/weedguid/weedguid.htm

BC Ministry of Forests and Range Invasive Alien Plants: www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfp/invasive/index.htm

E-Flora BC, Electronic Atlas of the Plants of BC: www.eflora.bc.ca

Global Invasive Species Database: www.issg.org/database/welcome/

IP-InfoSource: www.invasiveplantcouncilbc.ca/ compendium/

Weeds BC (BC Ministry of Agriculture and Lands): www.weedsbc.ca/

Provincial Inventory and Mapping Database Invasive Alien Plant Program (IAPP) Application, Reference Guide and Field Forms: www.for.gov.bc.ca/hfp/invasive/IAP_01.htm

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